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NAPABA LAW FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS

2001 || 2000 || 1999 || 1998 || 1997 || 1996

2001

At the annual dinner of the National Asian Pacific American Bar Association, held in Scottsdale, Arizono on November 17, the NAPABA Law Foundation announced the recipients of their annual law scholarship and fellowship awards in recognition of those law students who have demonstrated leadership and commitment to the Asian Pacific American community.

Anheuser-Busch NAPABA Law Foundation Presidential Scholarships - $5,000

Angela Okamura
McGeorge School of Law, 2004

A 1998 graduate of University of California, Davis, Angela Okamura has a long history of involvement and leadership in the APA communities in which she has lived as well as at her schools. While at UC Davis, she formed the Asian Pacific American Political Association to inform the UC Davis campus about APA student needs and to advocate constructive changes. Among her numerous other activities, Angela was a Planning Board member of the Japanese Cultural Club, Volunteer Chair of the Japanese Cultural Club, and Planning Board member of the Asian Pacific Islander Leadership Conference at UC Davis, and a Founding Board member and Chief Editor of the Newsletter of the Asian American Student Association at Cal State Sacramento. For the last three years she has been working as a Research Associate at UC San Francisco while continuing to volunteer to support, among others, the March of Dimes, Special Olympics, the Japantown Cultural Festival, and the Sacramento Public Library Literacy Program, and to act as an Advocate in the Court Appointed Special Advocate Program in Sacramento.

Erin Oshiro
UCLA School of Law, 2004

Erin Oshiro is a 1999 graduate of UCLA. Prior to attending law school, Erin was a Judicial Administration Fellow with Cal State Sacramento. In that role, she conducted a study of the operations of the Los Angeles Superior Court which may lead to major changes to improve the accessibility of court services to the community. While an undergraduate at UCLA, Erin worked as an intern with the Asian Pacific American Legal Center in Los Angeles where she was responsible for workshops to provide low income workers, primarily Chinese and Latino, with information about their employment rights. She played an important role in the historic Thai garment workers’ case and was recognized for her efforts and leadership by APALC which gave her their Annual Pro Bono Award in 1999. She has continued her involvement in the APA community with her work at the Little Tokyo Service Center and the Asian Pacific Policy & Planning Center.

NAPABA Law Foundation Scholarships - $2,000

Julie Chen
University of Texas at Austin School of Law, 2004

A graduate of the journalism program at the University of Texas, Austin, Julie Chen has written for several newspapers and publications. She has also taught English to students in Kowloon, China, and assisted students at Hong Kong Baptist University. While an undergrad, Julie co-chaired the Asian Cultural Committee which raised funds and sponsored speakers at the University of Texas.

Jae Choi-Kim
DePaul University College of Law, Chicago, 2002

A 1983 graduate of the University of Chicago, Jae Choi-Kim has been a leader in the Asian and Korean American business community. Her numerous accomplishments include being President of the Montrose Irving Chamber of Commerce, organizing a choral concert that raised $25,000 to aid torched Black churches in the South, and organizing press conferences as President of the Korean American Citizens Coalition during the events surrounding the Rodney King verdict. She has undertaken many projects to bring together the diverse communities in this country, including work with the American Jewish Committee, the Illinois Ethnic Coalition and the Japanese American Citizens League.

Michael Anh Dang
University of California at Berkeley, Boalt Hall School of Law, 2003

Michael Dang developed an English curriculum for Vietnamese refugees while working at a refugee camp in Hong Kong, interned at the Southeast Asia Resource Action Center in Washington D.C. analyzing legislation affecting Southeast Asian Americans, and volunteered to assist the Asian Law Caucus with their fundraising. His undergraduate independent research project was a field study on violence and drug abuse in the Hong Kong refugee camp.

Jae-Min Han
University of Pennsylvania Law School, 2002

Jae-Min Han is a 1997 graduate of the State University of New York — Binghamton and has studied at Moscow State University. She was Editor-in-Chief of Asian Outlook in Binghamton, a member of a Korean folk drumming troupe, and a Team Administrator at the Bronx Defenders office. Jae-Min also worked as an intern with Human Rights Watch in New York City.

Anh Nguyen
Seattle University School of Law, 2003

A 1996 graduate of University of Washington, Anh Nguyen has taught English to Vietnamese immigrants with Helping Hand, counseled battered women with the Women Center of New York, and worked as a legal assistant with the International District Legal Clinic in Seattle. She has also worked as a field producer with KVBC News in Las Vegas and KATU News in Portland, Oregon, taught English at the Vietnam National University in Ho Chi Minh City and participated in the NAPABA Law Foundation’s Thomas Tang National Moot Court Competition the last two years.

Avantika Rao
UC Davis Martin Luther King, Jr. School of Law, 2002

Avantika Rao received her BA from Wellesley in 1998 and has studied at the University of Wisconsin’s India Program in Bunaras and at the University of Pune, both in India. She has worked tirelessly with community service organizations: the Family Protection Clinic in Woodland, California, the Legal Services Employment Clinic in Sacramento, the Asian Law Caucus in San Francisco, the Immigration Law Clinic at UC Davis.

Charmagne Topacio
Chicago-Kent College of Law, 2002

While studying at Loyola University Chicago, where she graduated 1999, Charmagne Topacio was Vice President of the Chinese-American Student Alliance, an organization that she helped revive after being abandoned. She was also Council President of the East Village Youth Program, and was an officer of the Loyola University South Side Government Association. While at law school, she is Vice President of the Asian Pacific American Law Students’ Association, was a judicial extern in the ABA’s Minority Judicial Externship Program and is a Pro Bono Clinic Volunteer with Asian Human Services in Chicago.

Pao Yang
Hamline University School of Law, 2002

Pao Yang graduated from Concordia University in St. Paul, Minnesota in 1999. He was a Students of Color Recruiter for Concordia, a legislative intern for Rep. Andy Dawkins of the Minnesota House of Representatives and a Coordinator for the Asian American Census Awareness Committee. At Concordia, he was also President of the Southeast Asian Student Association and Co-Captain of the men’s soccer team. At Hamline University School of Law, Pao is Vice President of the Asian-Pacific American Law Student Association and Student Representative for the Hmong Bar Association.

Judge Robert M. Takasugi Fellowships for Public Interest Law $5,000

The NAPABA Law Foundation supports a public interest fellowship program in honor of United States District Court Judge Robert M. Takasugi to recognize his many years of dedication, commitment and service to the Asian Pacific American legal community.

Minah Park
Loyola Law School, 2002

As the 2001 Takasugi Fellow for Southern California, Minah worked with the Legal Aid Foundation of Los Angeles in their Housing Improvement Project. There, Minah assisted Legal Aid counsel in various stages of litigation as well as participated in a community outreach program focused on educating Korean-speaking tenants of their housing rights. Minah also interviewed tenants to help identify “slum” buildings that the Housing Improvement Project targeted through litigation.

Kathleen Park
Stanford University School of Law, 2002

The 2001 Takasugi Fellow for Northern California found herself dedicating her summer to her work with immigrants at the Lawyer’s Committee for Civil Rights in San Francisco. Through the Lawyer’s Committee, Kathleen interviewed and provided direct legal services to Ethiopian, Chinese and Vietnamese immigrants and refugees. She also assisted Lawyer’s Committee attorneys in its Asylum Program and in combatting the unlawful detention of immigrants by law enforcement.

2000 Anheuser-Busch NAPABA Law Foundation Presidential Scholars

Anheuser-Busch NAPABA Law Foundation Presidential Scholarships

Ms. Diana May Lin
Georgetown University Law Center, Washington, D.C., Class of 2004
Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Master’s in Public Policy, 1998
Pomona College, B.A. 1993

As a student at Pomona College, Diana Lin worked to establish an Asian American Student Resource Center and advocated for the hiring of the school’s first full-time Asian American Studies professor. She continued her advocacy on issues affecting Asian Pacific Americans: at Asian Americans for Equality, where she supported the rights of Asian immigrants; as fundraising co-chair for the Conference on Asian Pacific American Leadership where she raised funds for Asian American internships; as a Legislative Correspondent for Senator Carol Moseley-Braun where she worked on legislation to improve inner city schools; and at the Ford Foundation where she developed a program to increase jobs for young professionals in social justice organizations. She has also held internships at the MacArthur Foundation and the Department of Human Services for San Francisco. She is currently a Public Interest Law Scholar at Georgetown University Law Center.

Ms. Michelle Tong
McGeorge School of Law, University of the Pacific, Sacramento, California, Class of 2001
University of California at Santa Cruz, B.A. 1996
Nankai University, People’s Republic of China 1994

Michelle Tong has been a strong advocate for Asian Pacific Americans through her work as an intern with the Asian Law Alliance while in college, and as a paralegal for three years with the Asian Law Caucus. In these positions, she has assisted Asian immigrants with issues involving immigration, employment rights, domestic violence, housing and civil rights. At the McGeorge School of Law, Ms. Tong has been a member and leader of the Asian Pacific American Law Student Association, the Unity Board and the Black Law Students Association.

NAPABA Law Foundation Scholarship

Mr. Andre Geverola
University of Chicago Law School, Chicago, Illinois, Class of 2003
University of California, San Diego, B.S. 2000

While studying at the University of California, San Diego, Andre Geverola worked as an Executive Assistant for the San Diego Association of Mortgage Brokers where he was instrumental in organizing community service activities and volunteered his time for Habitat for Humanity and Kidfest, an event featuring free fingerprinting of children. At the same time, Andre worked with the Upward Bound program to assist inner city students, first as a teaching assistant for chemistry and algebra, then as a tutor, and finally as a chemistry instructor; he created and taught a general chemistry curriculum.

Judge Robert M. Takasugi Fellowships For Public Interest AW

The NAPABA Law Foundation participated in the formation this year of a public interest fellowship program in honor of United States District Court Judge Robert M. Takasugi to recognize his many years of dedication, commitment and service to the Asian Pacific American legal community.

Mr. Do Kim
University of California, Los Angeles, School of Law, Los Angeles, California, Class of 2002

For work at the NAACP Legal Defense Fund on projects including fighting racial profiling by the Los Angeles Police Department and increasing police officer accountability.

Ms. Rebecca Yee
University of California, Los Angeles, School of Law, Los Angeles, California, Class of 2001

For work at the CWLC, the California Women's Legal Center creating policy which will protect the civil rights of parenting and pregnant teens in high schools across California.

Ms. Hayne Yoon
New York University School of Law, New York, New York, Class of 2001

For work at the Asian Law Caucus, providing research, counseling and litigation services to defend the legal rights of our low-income minority populations.

New York University School of Law, New York, New York, Class of 2001

For work at the Asian Law Caucus, providing research, counseling and litigation services to defend the legal rights of our low-income minority populations.

New York University School of Law, New York, New York, Class of 2001

For work at the Asian Law Caucus, providing research, counseling and litigation services to defend the legal rights of our low-income minority populations.

1999 Anheuser-Busch NAPABA Law Foundation Presidential Scholars

Anheuser-Busch NAPABA Law Foundation Presidential Scholarships

Ms. Mariju Bofill
American University Washington College of Law, Washington D.C., Class of 2001
Transylvania University, Lexington, Kentucky, B.A. 1998

Mariju Bofill is a first-generation Filipino-American whose parents emigrated to this country in 1969 and settled in southern West Virginia. She was valedictorian of her class at Man High School in Man, West Virginia and received her Bachelor of Arts in Political Science from Transylvania University in Lexington, Kentucky, where she graduated magna cum laude. While at Transylvania, she was honored as a 1996 Filipino-American Leader of Tomorrow. She is now studying law at American University’s Washington College of Law in Washington, D.C. where she is Vice-President of the Asian Pacific American Law Students Association, Vice-President and Executive Board Member of the Criminal Law Society and Treasurer of the National Lawyers Guild. This year, Mariju Bofill was a Summer Coordinator for the Asian Pacific American Legal Research Center in Washington, D.C.; in that capacity, she supervised and trained volunteer staffers who assisted members of the Asian community in seeking and finding legal services in the areas of immigration, landlord/tenant and domestic violence. She is currently on the Executive Board of that organization. Ms. Bofill has worked for Representative Nick Rahall, the U.S. Department of Justice Civil Rights Division and is now a writing tutor at the Washington College of Law’s Legal Methods Program.

Ms. Jihee Gillian Suh
Georgetown University Law Center, Washington, D.C., Class of 2002
Harvard University, Boston, Massachusetts, B.A. 1997

Jihee Suh is a magna cum laude graduate of Harvard University where she majored in Government. At Harvard, she received the John Harvard College Scholarship and the Elizabeth Cary Agassiz award for academic achievement of highest distinction and she was Director of the English as Second Language tutoring program for Southeast Asian refugee children, President of Amnesty International and on the Executive Board of the Women’s Leadership Conference. At the same time, Ms. Suh worked for three years with the SafetyNet Hate Violence Prevention Project where she developed and conducted workshops about hate crimes and civil rights for community agencies and public housing tenants and served as liaison between victims of hate crimes and law enforcement officials. Upon graduating from Harvard, Ms. Suh was selected to be a New York City Urban Fellow and worked with the New York City Administration for Children's Services where she became Special Assistant to the Deputy Commissioner of Child Protection. She is now studying law at Georgetown University Law Center and expects to graduate in 2002.

NAPABA Law Foundation Cathay Pacific Scholarship

Ms. Rose Cruz Cuison
American University Washington College of Law, Washington, D.C., Class of 2000
University of Texas, Austin, Texas, B.A. 1996

Rose Cuison was born in the Philippines and grew up on the island of Saipan, a U.S. commonwealth. She majored in Government at the University of Texas in Austin, Texas and is now studying law at the American University Washington College of Law. While at the University of Texas, Ms. Cuison was a volunteer with an Americorps after school program for pregnant teens and with Legal Aid of Central Texas. After graduating college, Ms. Cuison returned to Saipan where she taught U.S. History, World History and Civics and chaired the Social Studies Committee at the Mt. Carmel High School. At American University Washington College of Law, she has received the Valentin Fuentes Immigration Fellowship and the Equal Justice Foundation Fellowship and she is the Chair of the Public Interest Committee of the Asian Pacific American Law Student Association. While in Washington, Ms. Cuison has volunteered with the Filipino Civil Rights Association, where she is a member of the Domestic Workers’ Committee, the Domestic Violence Resource Project, the Asian Pacific American Legal Resource Center and the Workers’ Rights Project of the Bread for the City and Zacchaeus Free Clinic. Ms. Cuison has also been a Legislative Consultant to the Senate of the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands where she drafted a bill creating college scholarships for poor minority students and a Consultant on Education to the Representative of the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands in Washington, D.C.

NAPABA Law Foundation Scholarship

Ms. Elsie V. Hui
University of California at Davis School of Law, Davis, California, Class of 2000
University of California at Berkeley, B.A. 1994

Elsie Hui is a graduate of the University of California at Berkeley, where she majored in English, was honored twice with the Alumni Association Leadership Scholarship and with the Michael J. Koll Leadership Scholarship. At Berkeley, she was Program Coordinator and a Teaching Assistant for a lecture series, Other Voices: Multicultural Perspectives, which examined issues of race and gender through literature and film. After college, Ms. Hui worked for three years with the Asian Pacific American Legal Center in Los Angeles where, as an Equal Access/Civil Rights Program Coordinator, she performed community education and advocacy work in the areas of affirmative action, immigrant worker rights, racial violence and voting rights. She is the co-author of three reports on anti-Asian hate violence and was a frequent speaker on that subject as well as on Proposition 209. While in law school, Ms. Hui is Co-Chair of the King Hall Legal Foundation, Treasurer of the National Lawyers Guild, and a teaching assistant for first-year legal writing as well as an undergraduate course on the Historical Experience of Asian Americans.

NAPABA Law Foundation Fellowship

Ms. Sonal S. Ambegaokar
University of California at Davis School of Law, class of 2000
University of Southern California, B.S. 1991

Sonal Ambegaokar is a 1991 summa cum laude graduate of the University of Southern California where she majored in Business Administration. During college, she volunteered to tutor inner city schoolchildren with the Joint Education Project and was Co-Chair of the Youth Program for Brihan Maharashtra Mandal. Upon graduation, Ms. Ambegaokar worked for six years with GTE Corp. in Illinois, Georgia and California, and volunteered at Apna Ghar, a shelter for battered South Asian women in Illinois. She entered law school in 1997 where she has served as Treasurer of the Law Student Association and as Co-Chair of the Martin Luther King Jr. Service Award Committee, worked with the Asian Pacific Law Association, Women’s Caucus, King Hall Legal Foundation and the Davis Refugee Aid Project. Ms. Ambegaokar has been the recipient of a Foundation of the State Bar of California Scholarship, a Women Lawyers of Sacramento Scholarship, the Asian American Bar Association Summer Grant, and a King Hall Legal Foundation Summer Grant. She has been awarded this fellowship to provide legal services and advocacy for Asian immigrant women who may be victims of domestic violence.

1998 Anheuser-Busch NAPABA Law Foundation Presidential Scholarsors

$2500 Awards

1998 NAPABA Law Foundation Scholars

$1000 Awards

    Wanchay Chanthadouangsy, DePaul University School of Law, 2000
    Amy Cheung, U.C. Hastings College of Law, JD 1999
    Milton Shundra Chou, Boalt Hall School of Law, UC Berkeley, JD 2001
    Betty "Jora Trang" Hai, Boalt Hall School of Law, UC Berkeley, JD 2001
    Lin Rose Walker, Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, JD 2000
    Josephine Yeh, Boalt Hall School of Law, UC Berkeley, JD 2001

1998 NAPABA Law Foundation Essay Excerpts

John Hayakawa Torok,
Columbia University School of Law, JSD 2001

I began to develop a vision of law teaching as service to the Asian American community in my first three jobs after the bar B as Professor Derrick Bell's research assistant, as a community organizer against racist and police violence, and as a research fellow in Asian American legal history. Organizing the first student-directed Asian American Jurisprudence class, held at Columbia Law School in Spring 1997, clarified that vision. The class, now in its third year, is part of the Columbia Asian Pacific American Law Student Association's (AAPALSA@) campaign to (1) increase the number of Asian Americans on the faculty and (2) add a class on Asian Americans and law.

As Professor Bell's research assistant, I helped update his classic treatise, Race, Racism and American Law. It was required reading in Professor Denise Carty-Bennia's Racism and Law Seminar at C.U.N.Y. I was persuaded by Bell's argument that the law was central B through slave codes, judicial decisions, and segregation laws B in African American racial subordination. Working on the 1992 edition made clear to me that racism in law still mattered.

As a community organizer fighting racist and police violence, I learned about the places where the law's protection does not reach. Law enforcement rarely took racist violence against Asian Americans seriously. Public education and lobbying was usually required before the legal system took notice. When police officers perpetrated the violence, the likelihood of any legal remedy diminished significantly. Limited or non-existent legal protection against racist violence represents a continuing challenge for the ideal of equal justice under law.

As a fellow in Asian American legal history, I learned about the law's role in Asian American racial subordination. Through reading the cases and statutes on immigration and testimonial exclusion, naturalization preclusion, alien land laws, Japanese American internment, and legal historical materials, I learned that anti-Asian racism is woven into the fabric of American law. To share my knowledge, I designed the curriculum for the Asian American Jurisprudence class.

All indications are that the Columbia APALSA campaign has increased faculty representation. We still hope the class will become a permanent part of the curriculum. Simultaneously learning the law of Asian American racial subordination and engaging the racial politics of curricular and faculty diversity enhanced APALSA members' race consciousness. My vision of law teaching as Asian American community service crystallized because of the class.

The vision centers on building Asian American legal race consciousness through teaching and scholarship. Asian Americans too often do not know about either (1) the legal history of Arace@ in America and AAsians,@ or (2) other histories of subordination and resistance to subordination. This creates challenges for unified Asian American political action. If one defines politics as re-shaping relations of power, racial politics may be defined as re-shaping racial power relations. Asian American racial politics, to be effective, requires accurate knowledge of American racial history. Advancing Asian American race consciousness has grounded my community service to date. It is now also why I aspire to teach law.

Rebecca Yee
UCLA School of Law, JD 2001

"There is more in a human life than our theories of it allow. Sooner or later something seems to call us onto a particular path. You may remember this "something" as a signal moment in childhood when an urge out of nowhere, a fascination, a peculiar turn of events struck like an annunciation: This is what I must do, this is what I've got to have. This is who I am." - James Hillman

As I contemplated your essay question regarding experiences that may have shaped my commitment to serving the needs of Asian Pacific Americans, I asked myself, "What was it anyway?" What particular event made me feel so much passion for helping others, particularly in the APA community? What circumstance created my enthusiasm to learn about social policies, the legal system, and community development? What singular moment in my life made me realize that public service is what I need to do in order to feel whole?

And then it occurred to me . . . this need, almost compulsion, of mine to help others was acquired and developed by my own personal struggles -- as a child of newly-immigrated parents, unfamiliar with the language and the culture of a new country; as a member of a family who has lived, for a number of years, slightly above the poverty line in the ghettos of inner-city Chinatown; as a minority female trying to survive and succeed among racist and sexist ideologies and norms prevalent in our country.

In my past and today, I have witnessed the struggles and cruelties amongst and between ethnic communities. I have been inundated with the realities of racial tension and violence. I have seen the lines of segregation divided by municipal vices and corresponding socioeconomic barriers that dictated the destinies of whole communities. There were very few moments when my family, friends, or I were not plagued by racial hostilities performed directly from individuals and groups, or indirectly from social institutions. Although I grew accustomed to hateful words and actions, these behaviors were drilled so deep into my consciousness that, even today, I am still affected by such racism. These experiences made me acknowledge at a very early age that my ethnicity would dictate how I am perceived; a foreigner in my own country.

You may think that these experiences are not unique. In fact, I agree, they are not. They are very comparable to many APAs with similar backgrounds - now often evidenced in anthologies and films that share the APA experience. However, it is how I reacted in these situations, and what I chose to do with these reactions that are significant. By accepting my past and committing to enrich my future, I managed to cross these lines of segregation and step past my own confines. Although my experiences taught me the harsh truths of economic perseverance and the nature of my fellow human beings, they also prepared me well for the realities of life, and bestowed upon me the inspiration to make change. Self-reflection enabled me to comprehend the pains and fears of others. Moreover, the need to alleviate this suffering through positive change became my motivation to help those who are underprivileged and less-fortunate, or whose human rights or civil liberties have been threatened. This emotional identification shaped my compassion and my commitment to public service, and compelled the ideology that it is just as integral and essential for us to serve our communities as our communities function to serve us. I am a firm believer of this philosophy and plan to devote not only my career, but also my life, to the APA community.

One instrumental step in pursuing my goal was attending law school. I chose to enter the legal profession because law is one of the best ways to battle injustice. In fact, my sole purpose for pursuing a law degree is to be able to learn everything about our legal system and then use this knowledge as working tools to benefit the greater community. My goal in becoming a civil rights/public interest attorney is to be able to create social change on two levels: one within the APA community on a grassroots level and the other within our government on a legislative level. From a grassroots perspective, I plan to organize programs and action groups to educate and empower community members. I also plan to mobilize and build coalitions in order to develop a strong representative voice for our community. This voice will accurately address the issues the are significant in the APA community - throughout our media, educational systems, business institutions, law-making bodies, etc. I hope to tear down the economic classes and inter-ethnic stereotypes that divides us as a group so that we may work together efficiently to combat inequities that affect us all. From a governmental perspective, I plan to be active in lobbying and advocating for laws and policies that affect the APA community. Therefore, I plan to develop a cohesive and sufficient working relationship with the government and the APA community, because I believe in our country's basic premise that our government is "made of the people, for the people". Therefore, a sound relationship needs to be constructed. Effective social change cannot be created without strong leadership, from both levels in the community and the government. Many have suggested to me that my goals for the community are too ideal, but a great social reformer named Mohandas K. Ghandi once said, "Most of what you do in this world will be insignificant, but it is very important that you do it anyway". I live by this quote and I always expect for the very best.

1997 NAPABA LAW FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS

1997 Anheuser-Busch NAPABA Law Foundation Presidential Scholars

$2500 Awards

1997 NAPABA Law Foundation Scholars

$1000 Awards

    James David Ahn, Harvard, 2000
    Deana K. Chuang, UPenn, 1998
    Rebecca N. Eichler, William & Mary, 1998
    Elizabeth Miyong Kim, Yale University, 2000
    Jinny Kim, UC Davis, 1999
    Jason Kai Ming Lum, UC, Berkeley, Boalt Hall, 2000
    Anthony S. Wang, Georgetown, 1998

1997 Presidential Scholars

The finalists of the 1997 Honorable Thomas Tang National Moot Court Competition received scholarship awards at the 1997 NAPABA Convention.

Best Brief: $1000 Scholarship

    Alyson Lewis, Hastings College of Law
    Charles Lockwood, Hastings College of Law

Best Oralist: $1000 Scholarship

    Tim Yusuf, South Texas College of Law

First Place Team: $2000 Scholarship

    Loyola University Chicago
    Kristin Corl and Grace Wee

Second Place Team: $1000 Scholarship

    Georgia State University
    Greg Ananthasane and Rupal Valishnav

The NAPABA Law Foundation is grateful to the Anheuser-Busch Companies for its exemplary commitment to the Foundation’s scholarship programs and for providing the funding for the scholarship awards to the 1996 class of NAPABA Law Foundation Presidential Scholars and NAPABA Law Foundation Scholars.

1997 NAPABA Law Foundation Essay Excerpts

Grace An-Li Lou, Georgetown, JD 2000

As an undergraduate student at Northwestern University, I served as the president of the Asian American Advisory Board (AAAB), the Asian American student union that promotes awareness of Asian Pacific American social, political, and educational issues. In the spring of 1995, when the Northwestern student struggle to establish an Asian American Studies program culminated in a twenty-three day hunger strike, I organized and led rallies and marches, each of which drew more than two hundred student supporters. Two years later today, the Northwestern administration is following through the commitment to find Asian American Studies professors and has initiated a series of Asian American studies classes. Holding steadfast to my desire to represent people of all ethnicities, I am prepared for the challenges of the legal profession. After working a few years in the law field, I plan on starting a non-profit organization which will develop leadership skills in the Asian American youth. To me, the Asian Pacific American community is in need of leadership and unity that can lead us into the 21 century with the respect that all Americans deserve.

Victoria Wong, Boalt Hall, JD/MPP 1999

I participated in the Coro Fellows Program, a public policy leadership training program, where I had the chance to observe how nonprofit, private and public sector institutions impact public policy. Subsequently, I became the Public Policy Coordinator at Asian Americans for Equality, a community-based organization in New York's Chinatown. There, I advocated for housing and economic development policies to benefit Asian Americans, researching the impact of these policies, testifying before elected officials, and developing collaborative projects with local community and government leaders. I later became a Project Coordinator at the New York Immigration Coalition, managing a program to increase immigrant access to city services. After graduating, I would like to continue to work on civil rights and community advocacy issues, ideally through a combination of litigation and lobbying. Eventually, I would like to lead an organization that promotes the rights of Asian Americans and other communities of color, particularly in the areas of economic development, housing and education.

1996 Anheuser-Busch NAPABA Law Foundation Presidential Scholars

$2500 Awards

    Gregory Z. Chen, New York University Law School, 1997
    Vida Gosrisirikul, University of Illinois College of Law, 1997

1996 NAPABA Law Foundation Scholars

$1000 Awards

    John Hayakawa Torok, Columbia Law School, 2001
    Robert E. Wone, University of Pennsylvania Law School, 1999
    Joane Si Ian Wong, University of Buffalo School of Law, 1999
    Yu-Yee Wu, University of Virginia Law School, 1998

$500 Awards

    Sandra T.M. Chong, University California, Davis School of Law, 1999
    Nelson Mar, State University of New York at Buffalo Law School, 1998
    Stella J. Ngai, Santa Clara University School of Law, 1997
    Tuan Anh Pham, Boalt Hall, University of California at Berkeley Law School, 1997
    Noel B. Vales, University of San Diego School of Law, 1997
    Robert Yap, George Washington Law School, 1999

1996 Presidential Scholars

The finalists of the 1996 Honorable Thomas Tang National Moot Court Competition received scholarship awards at the 1996 NAPABA Convention. The names of the Anheuser-Busch Scholars will be listed soon.

The NAPABA Law Foundation is grateful to the Anheuser-Busch Companies for its exemplary commitment to the Foundation’s scholarship programs and for providing the funding for the scholarship awards to the 1996 class of NAPABA Law Foundation Presidential Scholars and NAPABA Law Foundation Scholars.

Please check back to this site for updates about the NAPABA Law Foundation Scholarship Programs.

The NAPABA Law Foundation is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization established by the National Asian Pacific American Bar Association to provide financial support for legal education and legal services to the Asian Pacific American community. For more information about the NAPABA Law Foundation and its programs, please contact the NAPABA Executive Director, at (202) 626-7693 or ed@napaba.org.

For more information, please contact The NAPABA Law Foundation.


 

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